Fresh Hop Ale Festival

About the Festival

Proceeds from the Fresh Hop Ale Festival benefit Allied Arts of the Yakima Valley, to the tune of almost 20% of the annual budget. And what does Allied Arts do with the money? There's not enough space to list it all so here's a few examples:

  • Our locally-developed and nationally-recognized ArtsVan regularly heads out into neighborhoods, parks and schools to bring arts education to more than 5000 kids each year.
  • Eight art shows (including the Central Washington Juried Exhibit) annually fill our Peggy Lewis Gallery, a respected venue for artists' sales and a place of first opportunity for young, emerging, and under-recognized local artists.
  • Monthly Poetry Open Mic Nights give voice to regional poets of all ages and our annual Juried Poetry Contest (est. 1994) recognizes some of the finest of them with a public coffeehouse reading and publication.
  • The Millennium Arts Plaza (party central for FHAF!) was led by AAYV, the only National Endowment for the Arts millennium project site in the State and now our community's gathering spot.
  • Over 100 classes each the year are offered at the Allied Arts Center for adults and children, ranging from performing arts to visual arts to art exploration to summer art day camps.
  • Additional programs extend access to the arts, including musical presentations, lectures, community mural development, the Latino Film Series, outdoors movies in the parks, the Laughing Ladies and Merry Men's Luncheon, and (of course) the Fresh Hop Ale Festival.

Allied Arts of Yakima Valley

In 1951, Elon Gilbert gifted the building to the community on the condition that "said property shall be used solely and exclusively for theatrical, artistic and other public purposes." By 1962, the Allied Arts Council was formed to facilitate artistic purposes in Yakima; the group served as an umbrella organization for 15 arts groups in town at the time. Together, the Council brought the Seattle Symphony, Seattle Repertory Theatre, Metropolitan Opera Touring Co., and the Joffrey Ballet.

The second decade, 1972-1982, was a decade of growth and expansion, when Council funds were lent to start the Town Hall Lecture Series. The Council also advocated for the City's purchase of the Capitol Theatre and played a major role in the eventual reconstruction in 1975. Membership was opened to individuals as well as organizations. The Family Theatre Series began its run in 1983 and the ArtsVan launched its service to the community in 1985.

Allied Arts Council changed its official name and logo in the late 90's to Allied Arts of Yakima Valley to reflect arts service to communities throughout the Valley. In 1999, Yakima was chosen as Washington State's only site for participation in the nationwide "Artists and Communities: Americans Create for the Millennium" project. Internationally respected artist Wen-ti Tsen created the Millennium Arts Plaza in Downtown Yakima that now serves as a meeting place and symbol of our community.

Currently, arts classes, events, performances, festivals and gallery openings fill the center and the Valley with art and culture. Join us in a cultural experience today!

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